Tag Archives: Mário Sérgio

Fish, Football and the RAGE in Mexico

This is a 2-part guest post by Hilkman translated from the German articles originally published in December on his blog Du Bist Dran!

Brazil

K&M Jogos just released Treta do Anzol by Mário Sérgio and Rodrigo Sampaio Rodriguez (the latter is mentioned here under the name of Rodrigo Zuzu). Loosely translated the title is “Fish hook pranks”. In this crazy fishing tournament the members of a family argue about who has caught the best fish. Sadly you always seem to get other things, from monsters to mermaids and when there finally are fish there, you have to protect them from cats and envious relatives. For the others you’re in the same category, of course, and so you constantly duke it out as hard as possible. Whoever has the most fish at the end of the game can win the competition. It has been illustrated by Douglas Duarte.

Since summer I have a prototype of the football simulation Bola na Rede (Ball in the net) lying around here, sadly only with portuguese rules, so I couldn’t play it yet.

I was a bit taken by surprise by the Crowdfunding-Campaign for a completely redesigned version of the game by Yuri Piratello and André Coelho (illustrated by Rodrigo Satyro). Apparently it wasn’t just like that for me, since so far the campaign has barely gotten any attention. This despite the fact that this version doesn’t just include another game, called Footpoker, but as a sadly unusual stretch goal, it also includes a women’s team. Something like that is scarce and a nice detail. A successful end to the current campaign seems doubtful, in light of the weak start, but maybe this game will be published in one way or another anyway. I at least will keep my fingers crossed.

Chile

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One year ago in Essen I could already get to know an early prototype of Hegemonía: Sombras del Poder (Hegemony: Shadow of Power) (I had already reported on it quickly here). Now the game by Nico Valdivia Henning has been released. The publisher Niebla Games released computer games as well as board and card games, that mainly play in a shared universe, namely the world of Causa: Voices of the Dusk. In Hegemony you make alliances and take on challenges together. Each member of an alliance carries a hidden wager, which means the most successful alliance can profit. The art of bluffing and of course the skill in diplomacy are needed to be part of the right alliance at the right time. A whooping eight artists have been part of illustrating the game.

Mexico

On 20. November 1910  Francisco Madero called for the Mexican revolution against the dictatorship of Porfírio Diaz. For the 108th anniversary the Kickstarter campaign for the new edition of Tierra y Libertad (Earth and Freedom) by Saúl Sánchez was supposed to start (the predecessor was released in 2010 already). It didn’t make it quite in time, but now the campaign is running.
The players each lead a group of Mexican revolutionaries and try to topple the dictatorship, competitively or cooperatively, and establish a new constitution. The Kickstarter advertises connecting worker placement with direct conflict (making a kind of hybrid game). Now the Mexican revolution is not only 100 years, but also a whole continent away for most Germans, but maybe someone here has heard of guys like Emiliano Zapata, at least since 1994. If not, maybe the game offers a good opportunity to change that.

Peru

Junior Achievement is a nearly 100 year old organization, that aims to further entrepreneurship among youths. There are branches nearly everywhere, just like in Peru. At a competition of the organization, K’iraw una cia JA just won four categories with the game Wakkeball War, for the company of the year, the most innovative project, the best socially responsible project and the best production process. Now K’iraw will also compete internationally, first within the Americas. Behind it is a group of 27 students around the 16 year old Sathya Mariluz Garcia. In Wakkeball War four rival ball shaped characters are on their way to the legendary city Paititi. The game is played on a map of Peru and the actions are resolved through different kinds of cards. The game is supposed to further knowledge of Peru on the side, and you can download an app with questions in addition to the game. The author says that the game is intended to strengthen the national identity. Something that sounds a little weird from a German perspective isn’t that unusual in Latin America, I’ve found a bunch of games with goals like this before (see above). Mostly it is about a theme that is connected to their own history in some fashion.

RAGE

On 15th and 16th December RAGE (Roll a Game Expo) takes place in Mexican Guadalajara, a relatively large-scale project, which should become Mexico’s first real game convention. To convince the publishers and authors to come, a Mexican game award has been brought to life, which is supposed to be handed out in different categories. A jury does the selection, but an audience award is also planned. I already had the opportunity to look at a model of the trophy in Essen, the Quetzalera (english: Quetzaladder). Its a word play consisting of Quetzalcoatl and escalera, in which Quetzalcoatl is a central American snake god and escalera means ladder – You might know “Snakes and Ladders”, the classic ladder game. So the snake snakes itself through a ladder.

To my great joy there will also be an award specifically for Mexican games, even more specifically for those that present themselves at the convention. It spans from advanced prototypes to already released stuff. Role playing games are also part of it. For me, as a blogger, this award is also awesome, because I suddenly find out about a ton of games that I haven’t heard of before. It seems like there is a lot more to the Mexican gaming scene than I had previously assumed – Mexico is a little bit of a sleeping giant among the Latin American gaming nations. We’ll see whether the convention gives this a boost. One can hope.

I already reported on War for Chicken Island by Ivan Escalante last time. The campaign has since been canceled and restarted, this time with a lower financing goal and much more success – it was a massive difference to the first go they had. I still find the miniatures fun. Tierra y Libertad by Saúl Sánchez is currently in Crowdfunding, as you may know, at the latest since last Week. Kanyimajo by Ramón López I have reported on here already. Who else is there?

For 2019 Geisha by Ana Coronado at Detestable Games has been announced. As expected it takes part in Kyoto and several different Geishas try to be the most successful. For that reason they work on their skills, like poetry, Ikebana, music and so on. It is executed in the form of a worker placement game, where you play mini games at the places you wish to do something. I might not be the most experienced worker placement player on earth, but I haven’t come across a concept such as this before, and I often find mini games particularly appealing. The illustrations stem from Daniel Sotomayor.

Also with Detestable Games Meeplepalooza by Kina Jager and Santos Artigas is supposed to be released. In this drafting game you found a rock band and take part at a festival – where you of course want to be the band that everyone is talking about in the end. To get this done, you need musicians, instruments and good songs, that you need to write yourself, by filling in notes on sheets. Add to that a few nice solos and you’ll be famous in no time. The illustrations are made by someone by the name of Nabs.

There is supposed to be a crowd funding campaign for Geisha as well as Meeplepalooza in 2019.

Bound takes place in the future. More specifically in the year 2048. All humans have access to a kind of successor to the internet. The player try to dominate this net as hackers and remove their enemies from it. One is Shade, a super hacker, and the most successful criminal. The others try to follow in his footsteps and can’t shy away from anything to get to the top. Bound comes from a trio of authors, José Pablo Lara Robles, Erick I. García Rodriguez and Juan A. Velázquez Ovando. Art design wise E. Kazunari Shiraki Merida and Enrique Palos Reynoso are responsible.

Mentes Voladores is a party game by Luis Alfredo Cortés, which he designed together with Cristián Bredee. Every player has a plastic mind frog, or rather three of them. Each round you compete for a reward chip, then a task card is revealed. Reacting to that you flick the corresponding mind frog into the box – whoever does so first wins the chip, assuming that it was the right frog. Why frog? Well, those things kind of look like the frogs in the flicking games in my childhood. Mentes Voladores is supposed to be released in February 2019 under the label Lúdika y Artefactos.

Dark Maiden by Lis Luna is a cooperative card game for up to three people, in which you fight through four locations and gather items to finally face an evil end boss. Until then you should of course be strong enough. The illustrations come from six different artists and studios and Dark Maiden will be released by Sun Fairy Games.

Sajkab is the name of a World which various historical populations have been transported to by a mysterious maelstrom: Maya, Spartans and so forth. There continue having battles against each other that they’re used to from home. That’s the story that Omar Benitez tells us with his game Sajkab. It is a card driven board game, in which the players move their pieces through, partially, harsh terrain and try to get superiority in battles. Sajkab has been illustrated by Damiant.

My wild role playing time are long gone, and usually I don’t write anything about role playing games on here, but I’ll make an exception for Leyendas de Elden (Legends of Elden), since it also competes for the Quetzalera award. So far I know about Leyendas de Elden, that it is supposed to be a role playing game that is as accessible as possible, which also targets inexperienced role players or real newbies. Added to the simple rules there will be unusual character classes, and it takes place in a world that mixes fantasy and science fiction. Leyendas de Elden comes from Daniel Ortiz and will be released under the label OR15 Gamelab. This publisher also has another game in the race, a card game by Guillermo Esquivias, which will be unveiled at the expo. So we can be excited.

In Colorbugs by Israel Ramos the most famous artists of the garden, namely Vincent Van Bugh, Frida Kohlor, Pabug Picasso and Salvabug Dalí, want to finish their paintings. Each of them has their own goals, in the form of secondary colors behind a screen. To reach these goals, they have to mix the base colors that they find in the garden. The delightful illustrations come from Julieta Maldonado. The publisher is called Ludens Games and has released a diverse range of games in the one year of its existence, from abstract games, to educational games, to party games.

Chakkan is a deck building game for two players. Sadly I’m not that well-versed in this genre, but a push your luck mechanism was new for me: You place 8 of the cards from your deck in a face down pile and reveal two of them. If they match in color or number, you may reveal more – but if you reveal the wrong card, you need to place all of them back again. Or you stop and take the revealed cards onto your hand and can play them afterward. The game itself is a fighting game, in which you try to reduce your enemy to 0 points. The game, with illustrations, has been made by Juan José Cabrera Fernandez and has been released by Another Game.

I couldn’t find any substantial information about three more games:
Code 10: Chase the Alien by Jorge Velázquez
Demon Hunters by Hugo Hernández (probably another role playing game)
Party Booster by Alberto Sánchez

I will report on the results at some point.

Editor’s note: In this update on Kickstarter the winners have been announced. The organisers also have uploaded a video of the expo.

Hilko’s Hoard: New games from Latin America

This is a guest post by Hilkman translated from the German article originally published on his blog Du Bist Dran!

 

Since the last article had gotten rather comprehensive, I decided to dedicate a recurring column titled “New games from Latin America” towards this theme (there’s indeed always quite a bit of research to be done on this). Until further notice I’ll reserve the first Monday of a month towards it. We’ll see whether this works out or not, most likely these articles will vary greatly in length, depending on what I stumble upon. It’s something I’m quite excited about myself. For now I’ll just start like this. A pointer to begin with, towards the overview page I made concerning the Latin American publishers (German description). It was a lot of work, but if someone is coincidentally on their way to Latin America, he might want to take a closer look at the publishers of the corresponding country and think about what could be worth checking out. Additions and corrections are welcome, if someone happens to know anything, otherwise I’m always finding more myself as well.

Argentina

I don’t know whether it’s different today, but in my time at school in the eighties Latin American history was nearly a non-issue, especially the time after the spanish colonial rule. How nice is it then, that it’s possible to learn a great deal from board games. For example, that on the 20th of November 1845 a joint British-French fleet tried to break a blockade on the Paraná River to force open trade routes to the interior. They broke through in the end, but with so many casualties, that the intruders had to distance themselves from further attempts. Whats only a footnote in German perception is of great importance for South America. Since 2010 the 20th November is a holiday in Argentina.

Where I got all this from? I read up on it after I stumbled upon the game Soberanía (Sovereignty) by Julian P.L. Bracco, which he published (with Illustrations by César Carrizo) with his publishing company EPICA JUEGOS. Soberania is a cooperative historical simulation in which the players fight together against the invasion.

Not long after I learned of this game the publisher put another one out there: Just released is Cruce de los Andes (Crossing the Andes). It’s about the Argentinian hero of the fight for independence José de San Martin and his campaign to expel the Spanish colonial troops from Chile – this’ll be a topic for the next article at the beginning of July again. The current game wears the subtitle “Vol. 1: Gobernación” (Part 1: Government). A second part is being prepared. Cruce de los Andes mostly consists of cards, with which you can reenact the life of San Martin, but also entails two relatively freeform short RPG’s by Benjamin Anibal Reyna and Martín Bravo.

 

The publisher Tinkuy has released another literature game, this time in cooperation with the Chilean author María José Ferrada. It is about Haikus, those minimalistic poems in a japanese style. Invención de Haikus is once again not what purists may imagine a game to be, since it is just about creating Haikus – there is no point system or other victory conditions. Instead you draw cards with seasons, natural phenomenons, first letters, beginning or end verses and you craft Haikus. I myself have no idea about Haikus, but I’m gladly lured in by tasks such as these and would therefore like to try it. But before I do it in Spanish I’ll probably have to practice a bit more.

Brazil

Two years ago already, Eduardo Guerra has released his game Crop Rotation by self-publishing. In March it has now been released in a new version by Legião Jogos, sporting the title Crop Rotation: Bug Plague. In this farming game you have cards with tasks in your hand that require a certain order of the three crops in the game. You plant something and try to get the corresponding order. Sadly the others can ruin your plans. If you instead decide to play cooperatively, there are locusts that will intervene. The game was illustrated by Jonatas Bermudes.

Also planned for publication under Legião Jogos is Eleições 20XX (Elections 20XX), which is currently vying for support on the Brazilian crowdfunding platform catarse.me. It is about elections in a fictional land, in which – just as fictitious of course – smear campaigns, abuse of power and buying votes are the order of the day. The game includes voter cards with certain preferences and the players try to steer the voters that are inclined towards them into the right direction, and try to keep the ones that wouldn’t vote for them anyway from voting at all. The game originates from the pen of Bruno Carvalho and was illustrated by Rogério Narciso and Thiago Ramos.

The game Vossa Excelência – O Jogo Político (Excellence), announced under self-publishing by Fernando Augusto C. Prado and Marcelo S. Dias was illustrated by Douglas Duarte and also concerns itself with dirty politics, and this game can be found on catarse.me as well. In this scenario the players are already representatives and have to try to consolidate their powerbase until the next election. A little abuse of power is very convenient for that. Sadly, there are some annoying forces among civil society, that have their eyes on representatives exactly like these and who could potentially put a spoke in their wheel. Two crowdfunding campaigns about dirty politics at once – apparently the people in Brazil have a lot on their mind.

Games that are called Uga-Uga Bufapum are fascinating to me in a certain way. I’m not sure whether I would have felt differently if I could really speak Portuguese. What does one need again, to become the new biggest boss of a stone age tribe? The biggest club? The most fancy loincloth? Far from it – it’s mostly about being able to most impressively fart. To this end you play cards with, small up to catastrophic, farts and this of course into the general direction of your opponents. As soon as they become unconscious, the succession dispute is resolved. All of this is conceived by Mário Sérgio, the illustrations are by Victor Cavalcanti and the publisher is called K & M Jogos. A nice side note: The portuguese words for “fart” and “wordplay” are identical, so that when I first approached the game with google translate I still had the assumption that the game was a stone age era corny joke contest. Maybe that’d also be an idea for a game.

Likewise an unusual, and presumably a far better smelling story, tells Café Express by Kevin and Samanta Talarico. After the eruption of a terrible plant disease, the last three healthy coffee beans are transported through the land to plant them in uncontaminated soil and secure their survival (Coffee bean or humanity? Your choice). Of course unscrupulous gangsters aren’t far, with the intention to grab the precious cargo for themselves. In this game for two to four people, law enforcers play against criminals – although the roles are often switched. According to the publisher Potato Cat it is one of the first Brazilian games that make use of transparent cards. The illustrations come from Jéssica Lang. Café Express was successfully financed on catarse.me, meanwhile Potato Cat already has the next campaign under way.

This time it is about New Eden Project, that stems from the same authors, but has been illustrated by Tiago Sousa. In a dark future there is war and since more and more city are destroyed, the hour of the corporations that can build entire cities within weeks has come. The players compete to plan the best city of all time, that can then be built somewhere in a wasteland. You build with cards.

A publisher that’s still young is Dijon Jogos (yep, it’s really named after the mustard). I like their website even just due to this idea – other publishers should do this (even though such numbers are subjective. But 0% is definitely a pretty clear call).

The first game of the publisher comes from Diego de Moraes, it has been released in April and is called Os Incríveis Parques de Miss Liz (The unbelievable Parks of Miss Liz). It’s about the popular theme of amusement parks again. Every player builds their own park with all kinds of attractions on a tableau – so it is mainly a tile placement game, in which you try to puzzle together the most amusing park, but you’ll also have to be economical to be able to afford it in the first place. The illustrations are done by João “Raulex”.

Azzelij from Rodrigo Sampaio Rodriguez has been published in a small series by Zuzu Board Games. It’s a tile placement game, in which you have to place the tiles in such a way, that the circles that are created in the corners are a majority of your own color. The base game, that was already released in 2017, is a simple and rather relaxed old school game. Meanwhile there’s an expansion with which you can play with notably more complex scoring, so that the game feels more interactive and should resonate with a broader audience. At least to me it’s way more fun with the expansion than without.

When I first came across the fantasy pirate game Pélaghos on the net, I racked my brain over what the name could mean. Online dictionaries didn’t help, so I asked: It is the name of the game world, and the name leans on the greek word pélagos, which means sea, and is also found in the word Archipelago. Learned something again! Pélaghos comes from Ney de Alencar and Roice and Thiago Mello and is the debut game of the publisher Tiki Games. It just finished a successful campaign on catarse.me. Herein you play one of four human nations and try to gain supremacy over a variably constructed archipelago in which not only other beings like fairies and minotaurs, but also a great deal of dangers lurk in itself. You can gain victory points with different methods, whether trade, adventure or others. The game is steered by a massive amount of cards, that you’re supposed to take on your hand in the right combination. The illustrations come from Guilherme Rodrigues Soares. The game looks big and ambitious anyway, but the publisher adds one on top regardless: In the near future a novel by Pedro Ricardo Piccini is supposed to be released, that takes place in the Pélaghos world.

Tá na mesa seems to approximately mean about as much as “It is served!” There’s again another cooking challenge, but this time it is about the top chefs making the best traditional fare. The players gather ingredients, prepare their meals and have to present them as well in the end. Whoever does this the best wins. Anyone who wants to know more can take a look at their current crowdfunding campaign (the rules are in Portuguese, but the game is nearly not language-dependent, according to publisher Mamute Jogos).

Chile

“The 11” (“La Once”) is actually a small snack in the late afternoon, but in Chile the term has changed its meaning and refers to a meal in the afternoon that can also take on a slightly bigger scope. Despite this I first had problems to understand the game title “La 11 Coffee & Tea Party“, yet it’s still about coffee and cake. In a (fictitious) café called La Once there’s a promotion each year where the guests have to play for their food. Only the winners get served the best food, while they play out the finale. Now the café has released the game to the public. Its a tight scramble for the best combination of three of the six treats (Set Collection and Take That). Recently I had written that the coolest game boxes are from Columbia. But this novelty from Chile is a real competitor here, since it is reminiscent of a cookie bag. That instantly whets the appetite. Author Carolina Baltra wants to speak to a public beyond Chile with this sweet theme, but is also thinking about releasing a version in the future, that orients itself more on Chilean customs. The illustrations stem from Paloma Amaya and the publisher has the nice name Juguemos+ (“Let us play more!”).

In the last moments, so to speak, I stumbled upon a crowdfunding campaign for Art Pieces that just started. A Chilean drawing game, of which I don’t even know who made it. The game seems to get released bilingually (English/Spanish), but the campaign is completely in Spanish, so that I just have to hope that I approximately understood the concept. The group draws three cards on which a single element of a picture is given, and an encompassing theme. Everyone now has 90 seconds to draw something according to these guidelines. Only after the drawing has been done a card is revealed, that determines which factor is relevant for the rating of the pictures. Those aren’t always the most artistically valuable portraits, but rather it could also be the most boring or the most simple.

All pictures with the gracious permission of the right holders.