Tag Archives: Korea Boardgames

Finalists of Korea Boardgames Design Contest 2018 announced

Thanks to all who participated in the design contest by our friends at Korea Boardgames. We received many interesting submissions by authors from Korea and all over the world. After reading the rules of all submitted games and some difficult decision making we chose the following finalists in the KBG Design contest 2018:

Antasia – Otto Jensen
Four Gardens – Martin Dolezal
Fruits Rush – Romain Caterdijan
Global Towers – Julio Nazario
Morf – Jørgen Brunborg Naess
So full – Tim Schilstra
The Madhouse – Walter Vaes
Sau(g)clever – Jean Claude Pellin
눈대중 생선가게 – 최재오
두근두근 회전초밥 – 슈어팀
레드 저널리즘 – 이성원
보석 탐험대 – 박준영
비포 선 라이징 – 이현지
시궁쥐 항구의 밀수꾼들 – 박정상
캐셔 – 조영후
팀몰라 아무도 – 배정수
프리라이더 – 장한솔
히어로레이스 – 이교운

We will contact each finalist individually to arrange the shipping of the prototypes to our office.

Global Boardgame News (March 5)

This series is released once or twice a month, covering international gaming news, trends and just plain gossip spotted online. 

Got something we should write about? Leave it in the form below the article.

Last week the Festival International des Jeux ended in Cannes, France with several interesting titles revealed here. JP game lovers in particular will rejoice over the handful of titles with Tokyo Game Market DNA that made their way to Europe.

Let’s kick off the news with Kimono, Superlude’s new edition of Colors of Kasane. Kimono is a card game in which players try to create the most beautiful kimono possible using the cards in their hands.

The game comes with real buttons and is just gorgeous to look at.

Meanwhile, Iello had three games from Game Market in their program.

We covered The Legend of the Cherry Tree that Blossoms Every Ten Years and Nessos in our previous article, when they were shown at Nuremberg Toy Fair.

The new addition was Les Forets Legendaire, a new version of 8bitMockup by Toshiki Sato – winner of the “Best Game” award at Tokyo Game Market in December last year.

Last but not least, the expansion for Paper Tales was unveiled in Cannes.

Paper Tales: Beyond the Gates adds new buildings and units and components to play all by yourself or with up to 7 players.

While we and our colleagues from Korea Boardgames were in Cannes hunting for new tabletop treasure, we also showed our upcoming trick taking game The Bark Side to Eric Martin.

They shot an overview video which will go live shortly – until then you can check out these glimpses on social media.

The Bark Side will go live on Kickstarter in April, and will be released at Essen SPIEL 2018.

The next convention of interest is the Game Market in Osaka on 1st April.

There have already been some announcements regarding that show….

Hisashi Hayashi will reveal his new title Metro: Tokyo & Osaka. We don’t know anything yet except for the cover art:

Takamagahara announced their new game Buzzzter, which will also premier at Osaka Game Market. This new title is once again designed and illustrated by Peke, featuring her distinctive style.

Other interesting announcements include Jack Times Beanstalk and Liquer: The Game featuring some very classic cocktails.

In late breaking news, we had to share the amazing (and delicious) components in an upcoming title from Big Fun Games. Stay Real: Just Waffle? A slogan we can all get behind!

The next shows we will be attending are Spiel Doch in Duisburg and Spieltage in Ratingen.

We’ll bring NiceGameShop for you to browse and buy. Please come by and say hello if you’re in the area! 

In other links:

  • Dojo-management sim Master of Respect by Hobby Japan is live on Kickstarter. This is actually an older game released at Tokyo Game Market 2016.
  • Another Kickstarter worth mentioning is Dream Catchers by Singapore-based Play Nation Studio. This was available in very limited quantities at Essen 2017, and people who bought this version will have the chance to purchase just the (extremely cute) minis expansion.

Korea Boardgames 2018 Design Contest

Topic

  • Games with special components (no games only using cards, dice and tiles)
  • All themes and genres welcome!

Jury Criteria

  • Elegance (Easy rules that still provide interesting and engaging gameplay)
  • Technical Excellence (Well-rounded rules without loopholes or imbalances)
  • High Replay Value
  • Originality
  • Games with an interesting use of timers will get an advantage in the judge process

Entry Conditions

  • Both new and experienced authors may participate
  • Only original, unpublished games
  • Rules may be sent in English or Korean
  • No submissions by Korea Boardgames employees are allowed

Required Submission Content

  • Complete rules (.pdf, .doc or .ppt)
  • 1-2 Pictures of the game in progress
  • Game Description (not more than one A4-page)
  • Author Information Sheet with (scanned) signature find it here)
  • Prototype (only if selected for the final round)

Prizes

Gold
US$ 1000 + the offer to publish the game at Korea Boardgames with a $1500 royalty down payment

Silver
US$ 500

Jury and Selection Process

  • The Jury will consist of the Korea Boardgames Editorial Team.
  • Jury decisions are final and there is no right of appeal.
  • No reason for elimination from the contest will be given.

Special Entry

The 2018 design contest is open to games with special physical devices. Entries with these devices will not need to send prototypes after passing the first round. However, a detailed explanation that clearly explains the device will be necessary.

Other Rules

  • The rights to the games remain with the authors at all times.
  • Submissions should be sent to: go@koreaboardgames.com
  • Korea Boardgames is not to be held liable for any unsolicited mailings
  • Entries that don’t fulfill the requirements outlined in section 3 of these rules will be disqualified
  • In case of fraud by participants, KBG reserves the right to withdraw or reclaim prizes as appropriate

Timeline

Contest Announcement
February 12th

Submission Period
February 12th to June 1st

Finalist Announcement
July 23rd

Prototype Sending
July 23rd to August 17th

Finalist Testing
Until October 8th

Announcement of Winners
October 8th

Global Boardgame News (February 10)

This series is released once or twice a month, covering international gaming news, trends and just plain gossip spotted online. 

Got something we should write about? Leave it in the form below the article.

The last few weeks were mostly focused on the International Toy Fair. So grab a bratwurst and throw on some lederhosen, because we’re going to Nuremberg!

At Sweet Lemon Publishing, we were happy to reunite with our friends from Korea Boardgames, who brought a booth for the first time.

Most of their wheeling and dealing involved their Essen 2017 releases. However, there was one new title for Eric Martin to scope out

We’re helping Korea Boardgames bring their first game to Kickstarter in the near future. Stay tuned for The Bark Side!

Elsewhere, most of the publishers were based in Europe, but there were outliers. It was particularly interesting to see Tokyo Game Market make its presence felt.

Those who missed it at NiceGameShop will be happy to hear Queen Games is releasing King of Frontier (scoop)!

Hobby Japan are releasing a new version of dojo-simulator Master of Respect.

American publishers Deepwater Games will be releasing Round House and Sorceror & Stones from EmperorS4 after their initial campaign to launch Herbalism and other small-box titles.

Bakudan Takarabako “Bomb & Treasures” is being released by IELLO with a new (Greek) theme and a new name: Nessos. They will also be releasing The Legend of the Cherry Tree that Blossoms Every Ten Years which updates Hitohira, another treasure from Tokyo Game Market.

From Russia, GaGa Games brought Lords of the Fjords – a strategy game with a viking theme (and lots of cubes).

Moscow’s Hobby World unveiled the latest expansion to Viceroy. Times of Darkness adds ‘fastidious aristocrats and shady underworld figures’ to spice up your games.

Hedgehog Roll by Lifestyle is a charming ‘roll and move’ game in which you roll a sticky velcro ball to collect forest goodies. Use the goodies to move your hedgehog on the board to escape the fox. It’s aimed at children (obviously), but can be also quite challenging for adults and can be played either cooperatively or competitively.

Do You Gnome Me? is a memory game that challenges players to rebuild a gnome’s features after seeing them for just a second.

Sort of like police sketches after a very small crime…

Dawn Under is a reprint of a Zoch Game from 2004 which was on the Spiel Des Jahres recommendation list. While out of print in Germany it held its popularity in Russia and Lifestyle are bringing it out again with updated artwork.

Also from Lifestyle, Finding Nessie is in the same vein as Lifestyle’s Macroscope from 2016. It challenges players to lift tiles and collect all 6 parts of the legendary Scottish beastie.

Keeping things watery, the final Lifestyle title is Aqualiens. In this speed game, players flip over a card revealing how many extremities their alien needs. Then it’s a race to collect the right transparent cards to match.

In other links:

Winners of the KBG Design Contest 2017

After many entries, hours of playtesting and a lot of discussion, it’s time to announce the winners of the 2017 Korea Boardgames design contest.

We’d like to thank all those who submitted – and encourage everyone to keep working on their designs, as we’re looking forward to more tabletop treasure in 2018!

Now for the final decisions…

1st

The Age of Discover​ (Joo Bong Hwan)

2nd

Grand Museum (Rob Cramer)
Hoon Min Jeong Eum (Park Na la)

2017 Korea Boardgames Design Contest

Topic

  • Family game to gamer’s game
  • 60 minutes or less
  • All themes and genres welcome!

Jury Criteria

  • Elegance (Easy rules that still provide interesting and engaging gameplay)
  • Technical Excellence (Well-rounded rules without loopholes or imbalances)
  • High replay value
  • Originality

Entry Conditions

  • Both new and experienced authors may participate
  • Only original, unpublished games
  • No games that have been entered into other contests or submitted to a publisher during the time of this contest
  • Rules may be sent in English or Korean
  • No submissions by KBG employees are allowed

Required Submission Content

  • Complete rules (.pdf, .doc or .ppt)
  • 1-2 Pictures of the game in progress
  • Game Description (not more than one A4-page)
  • Author Information Sheet with (scanned) signature – find it here

Prizes

Gold: US$1000 + the offer to publish the game at KBG with a $1500 royalty down payment

Silver: US$500

Jury and Selection Process

  • The Jury will consist of the Korea Boardgames Editorial Team
  • Jury decisions are final and there is no right of appeal
  • No reason for elimination from the contest will be given

Special Entry

The 2017 design contest is open to games with special physical devices. Entries with these devices will not need to send prototypes after passing the first round. However, a detailed explanation that clearly explains the device will be necessary.

Other Rules

  • The rights to the games remain with the authors at all times.
  • Submissions should be sent to: go@koreaboardgames.com
  • KBG is not to be held liable for any unsolicited mailings
  • Entries that don’t fulfill the requirements outlined in section 3 of these rules will be disqualified
  • In case of fraud by participants, KBG reserves the right to withdraw or reclaim prizes as appropriate

Timeline

  • Contest Announcement: April 26th
  • Submission Period: April 24 – June 30th
  • Finalist Announcement: July 31st
  • Prototype Sending: July 31st to August 16th
  • Finalist Testing: Until October 16th
  • Announcement of Winners: October 16th

Win the Game of Your Choice

To celebrate 1,000 Twitter followers we’re giving away a stack of cool prizes!

Prize A – massive stack of 7(!) titles from Korea Boardgames

Prize B – Terrible Monster (with expansion) and upcoming Fantasy Defense


Prize C – the NiceGameShop title of your choice! Just tell us why you deserve it more than everyone else


To enter: retweet this post with the game you want from NiceGameShop and the reason you deserve it.

Good luck!

King’s Pouch

I was a little hesitant to pick up Korea Boardgames’ King’s Pouch after last week’s review of Burano.

They’re both fairly weighty worker placement games, and I was worried about covering similar terrain. Do we really need more talk about pushing cubes?

However, King’s Pouch really is quite a different machine – and not just the bag building.

Wait, what’s bag building?

To answer that, we need to travel back to 2014. Dominion was a smashing success, deck building was beginning to show its age, and publishers were looking for the next big variation.

This is the best way to understand King’s Pouch, and why it became so overlooked.

Theme

After the king’s death, our realm has fractured into competing fiefdoms, each ruled by a would-be successor. Like you!

From the rulebook:

You will use your citizens to develop your lands, muster armies and amass wealth. You may even try to secure the goodwill of influential public figures, like the remainders of the royal family.

But never forget to keep the dishonest parts of your society in check: Excessive corruption may lead to your downfall sooner than you think.

It’s stock-standard medieval material: knights, taverns, lots of concern for wheat crops.

However, there’s also an emphasis on corruption, represented by good-for-nothing, layabout officials who stink up your kingdom with their greed. Corrupt officials are lazy so can’t be placed anywhere useful – a big problem in a worker placement game.

I love ordering the city watch (manned by my finest red soldier cubes) to throw them out!

City construction is also satisfying, with a little tableau reflecting each player’s strive for commercial, religious, or military might.

There’s a real sense of accomplishment in placing the Festival Plaza or sending your armies to (extremely abstract) victory. Unfortunately, almost all of this theme is conveyed mechanically.

You’re hiring workers, training them, setting them to work in various businesses – everything makes sense. But the artwork places that action in a generic medieval Europa.

With a little more effort, King’s Pouch could have been its own place in the world.

Mechanics

 So, what’s a bag builder? It’s deck building with a bag.

At the beginning of their turn, players draws five colored workers from their own pouch. These could be generic common citizens, soldiers, merchants or clerics – or despised corrupt officials.

Workers are placed on constructed buildings to generate resources (such as money or military strength), alter workers (such as upgrading common citizens to merchants) and trigger various unique abilities.

For example, the School building requires a cleric to activate, at which point it generates 5 victory points and converts a common citizen into a specialist. Makes sense, right?

Players generally construct a building each turn, and can also use military strength to conquer and re-conquer land representing the wider kingdom.

All drawn workers are set aside and replaced with new workers at the end of the turn. If there aren’t enough in the bag, old workers are returned and randomly re-drawn.

Like I said, deck building with a bag!

For newer players, there can be a strong ‘multiplayer solitaire’ vibe, but over time the strategies and interactions become clearer. The military struggle is particularly tense with two players, and adds some nice take-that to the mix.

Components

King’s Pouch runs with the noble Euro tradition of wooden blocks.

Interestingly, specialist workers are cubes, while common citizens and corrupt officials are hexagonal prisms. This means they can be identified (with a little work) when players are pulling from the bag – allowing for some control and strategy in the draw.

This isn’t something I grok as a design choice, but many players enjoy the mini game, and it certainly leverages the bag building mechanic.

Otherwise, there’s not a lot to say about the components. The graphic design is functional but a little generic, and small cards reduce the overall visual impact on the table.

So King’s Pouch is all about the gameplay. That’s certainly not a bad thing, but it is a missed opportunity.

What do others think?

King’s Pouch  had a fair-to-positive response, and is rated 6.8 on BoardGameGeek.

However, the game was unlucky enough to be released at the same time as the more thematic Hyperborea and Orléans, which dimmed its appeal.

Three completely different games all meshed together to create one experience that just flows really smoothly, really quickly – very quickly.

Rahdo Runs Through

 

There’s a lot of interesting things. It just doesn’t gel together as well as I’d like it to.

Tom Vasel

 

King’s Pouch has some clever ideas and everything just feels well thought out. Well, nearly everything…

Alex Singh

Conclusion

King’s Pouch draws a lot of different elements into a cohesive whole, while building on the (then) novel mechanic of bag building.

Everything flows incredibly smoothly – the listed play time really is much quicker for experienced players – and even when you’re being completely thumped you can see how to do better next time.

If you can look past the vanilla theme, King’s Pouch is definitely a game that deserves more attention.

4 grand banquets out of 5.

Number of Players: 2-4

Playing time: 60 mins

Age: 10+

Country: Korea

By: Korea Boardgames

Price: 24.99€ at NiceGameShop