Tag Archives: Coisinha Verde

New Games from Latin America (July 16)

This is a guest post by Hilkman translated from the German article originally published on his blog Du Bist Dran!

My overview today turns out a bit shorter (and I also couldn’t get a hold of pictures to all games), but I did warn about that earlier already. I researched diligently, but at the moment I’m finding mostly stuff for August and September. I’m guessing it’ll pick up the pace a bit by then. And then there’s already the convention…

Argentina

Piensa Palabra (Think of a Word) is the first game by the publisher Multiverso, but further games are already in print (more on that soon, I guess). It’s a simple word game, in which three cards are flipped, one of which shows an initial, one a content category and a third a further description of the word. Whoever finds a fitting word shouts it out and and may take one of the cards, which will then be replaced. The player that has first gathered 10 cards wins the game. The author of the game is Shannon Conly.

Brazil

Coisinha Verde (Small Green Thing) is the name of a publisher, who fittingly released a game called Card Goblins, and this in 2012 already. Since this game by Tiago Junges is the most successful card game of the Universe, according to the publisher, he’s now going one better and has started a crowd-funding campaign for a new edition, which will contain at least a Pirate- and a Ninja expansion (depending on the success of the campaign even more). The players send their pirate armies against a city that houses piles of treasures. To get one of the three coveted victory points, you need to gather a certain combination of treasures, which is sadly the same goal as that of the other armies. This of course means conflict, which you try to decide for your side with the individual abilities of your own army.

Chile

Entre Juegos is a well known games shop in Santiago. Juan José Fernandez developed a game for this shop that is also called Entrejuegos. This about translates to “between games” and is a reaction game for two people, in which they smack cards onto the table to get rid of them as fast as possible. Whoever manages to do so first gains a whole lot of points. If the contestants pay attention to whether the enemy, or enemies, plays a card between two of the same cards, they can gain extra points, so on the one hand it’s about speed, but on the other it’s about observation. The game doesn’t just get into the name of the shop with its own name, but also its concept. For the release of the game there was support by the relatively new agency Caldero de Juegos (Games Cauldron), that helps small publishers with printing (in China). The design of Entrejuegos has been done by Pablo Céspedes.

Peru

After humanity was able to be contented by Yahtzee for decades,“Roll and Write” has lately established itself as its own genre of games and enjoys great popularity. And this isn’t just the case here (in Germany), but also in Peru, where Inkarumi by Javier Orejas has been republished recently (the original is from 2011). Inkarumi roughly means “Stone of the Inka” on Quechua and it’s about building a pyramid, in which the bottom stones are made of sixes, the five stones above it made of fives and so on. You throw your dice around to start with and fill out as many boxes as possible, although you can only build the upper levels, if they’re already standing on two built stones below. As soon as someone has built it all except for six or less stones, the game gains a speed component. Whoever rolls in a way that would make them capable of finishing the pyramid, has to shout “Inkarumi” to be able to fill out all the stones. If someone else calls out first, the turn is lost. If you wrongly shout Inkarumi, however (whether it’s your turn or not), you lose stones on your own board.