Global Boardgame News (April 27)

This series is released once or twice a month, covering international gaming news, trends and just plain gossip spotted online.

Got something we should write about? Leave it in the form below the article.

Hello and welcome back again to another edition of our Global Boardgame News. “How come so soon?” you might ask. Well, because of the massive amount of new releases at the upcoming Tokyo Game Market next week May 5-6 and so that everyone can make a more informed decision on our survey about which games to bring back to NiceGameShop.

Thanks for everyone who already took the survey. If you have not already you really should as we will draw one lucky winner who receives 50€ store credit for NiceGameShop to use on all the hotness!

Let’s get going with the new games.

Zee Garcia of the Dice Tower seems to be a big fan of the games by Saashi & Saashi and with good reason: Their games have unusual themes, beautiful distinctive artwork and innovative gameplay. Their new game Let’s Make a Bus Route will be no exception and offers according to the publisher the simplest rule of any of their games yet.

Let’s Make a Bus Route

is a 2-5 player board game where players draw bus routes on a map of Kyoto. You play the role of a bus company employee tasked with making a new bus route.

To make an effective route you must fulfill the needs of visiting tourists, commuters, students, and elderly passengers, while balancing impacts on the city including road traffic. Can you build the bus route that delights the most riders? Wouldn’t it be wonderful to connect to a famous sight-seeing spot while building your requested route? When the busses start moving will you have built the route that delights the most riders? 


The Lost Woods is a cooperative card sliding game by the board game circle Oui-Kai. Within a time limit of 8 minutes 1-4 players try to guide Little Red Riding Hood to the grand mother’s house without getting eaten by the big bad wolf.


In the past designers who showed their games at TGM were often self-publishing and in many cases self-assembling their games. Since they made it for the artistic aspect and not the business side of it, printruns were often as low as 100 copies and if a game was sold out it was gone.

It feels like that around 75% of the games shown at TGM are either purely card games or card games with 1 or 2 added components, mostly cubes or small components you might find at a art supplies shop. These are games you can make inexpensively and are quite fitting for the punk attitude of many publishers at TGM.

While the indie spirit is still very strong at Game Market, this is changing as board games are becoming a bigger market in Japan and Asia and publisher and visitor attendance at TGM is rising every year.

New Games Order was early to break that trend and tends to publish some of the biggest Japanese games in terms of size, scope and materials. They have published Stone Garden with spectacular stone pieces which was also released in an English version in 2014. Then they have followed up with titles like Sixth Rural Village and Patronage, which were unfortunately never translated into English.

At TGM they will be showing Glover, a Euro game for 3-5 players by Akase Yog. With over 300 components it will be definitely one of the biggest games released at the show, but up until now rules were only published in Japanese and information is scarce.


 

Yamato Games is showing their 6th game at Game Market and their titles are easily recognizable because they all have the same size and the same clean and fancy graphic style. After games like Cat’s Party and Animal Village they now show Green Finger, an easy cute, area control type card game for 1-4 players.

The game comes with 29 cards. 25 of them are put facedown in a 5×5 grid in the middle of the table with only the middle card face up and each player gets 1 hut card in their hand. In a turn the player takes a face down card and plays then one card from their hand in the grid where they have just taken the card. When all cards in the middle are face up the game ends and scoring happens. The hut card of each player decides how many points a player get.


Happiest Town is the new game by Toshiki Sato, who previously designed Dice Age: The Hunt and 8bit Mockup, which won the Best Game of TGM 2017 autumn award.

They had a preorder campaign running and because more than 100 copies were sold there, each copy at TGM will include 8 promo cards. What to do with the promo cards and how does the game play? Since the English rules were already posted on BGG they know the answer:

Take charge as one of many mayors in Happiest Town to build buildings and attempt to make your city the happiest of all. The game includes more than forty types of buildings, and in the game you earn money, build stuff, earn more money from what you’ve built, and score at the end of the game with your city’s happiness being determined by a “population x happiness” formula.


The idea of Hiktorune is clever and unlike anything I have ever seen. It is a cooperative dexterity game for 1-5 players, in which you pull cards out of a vertical stack of cards. If you pull them out successfully you can trigger the effects.

The publisher Koguma Koubou previously released BABEL, which mixed the card tower stacking of Rhino Hero with hidden traitors!


Another game for which we don’t know much about the rules but just adore the components is Monster Empire by Freaky Design Inc. We saw the game in a prerelease form at TGM in December last year with wooden standees.

Now they are made out of cardboard but still look phenomenal. The back of box suggests that the game is coming with English rules so we are definitely excited to try out the game while we are in Tokyo.


Gift10Industry must be one of the most innovative companies when it comes to board games. After making games for blind people and a Virtual-Reality party game they are showing their newest creation at TGM.

Morse Karuta by Takashi Hamada is a fascinating educational app-based speed game, in which the 2-8 players can actually learn morse.

There are two different version to play the game. You can either place the cards with the morse code face up and one player taps the morse code on the smartphone and the others try to grab the right card as fast as they can or you can play the advanced rules in which the cards are with their picture side face up and one player taps the morse code while the others have morse reference cards in their hand and try to hear what the right word is and grab the picture card.


Madrick by first-time publisher Sextile Zealot is a game that could interest many people, if only you could find some information in English about it. The only gameplay explanation is blocked in a graphic, so that google translate can’t reach it, but the artwork and the tone of the game immediately drew us in and gave us strong Darkest Dungeon vibes.

We know that it is a 2-player card-driven battle board game with strong Cthulhu influences. Since the components themselves have no language on it, the only thing stopping us from trying it out is that there don’t seem to be any English rules available.


Rule of Magic by River Games is another game we hope to have English rules for one day, but since the game was released already at Osaka Game Market and there was an interesting article from Sugoroku, we know a little bit more about it.

Rule of Magic is a game for 3-6 players in which the players place tokens with a certain number and color on the seven spaces on the board and try to have certain cards in hand similar to poker to gain points.

The interesting aspect is however that rules can be proposed freely, as in every player has a sheet of paper and can write down a rule they would like to play with. Then there is a vote and if the rule reaches a certain number of points it will be integrated into the game.

Rules like “50 points for each red token on the board”, or “The player with the longest facial hair gets 1000 points” could be proposed and then voted on.


Run Metro! by Gemini Games is a tile laying game for 2-4 players. Each player starts the game with 1 tile in hand and each turn draws one tile and may play one tile which has to connect to one tile already in play.

When a station was formed at both ends of the same color line, the player completes a route section and scores points. The score is the sum of the numbers written at the station at both ends multiplied by the number of ○ in the route.

There are also landmark tiles which score points the moment they are placed. It is possible to play both tiles in hand at once thus finishing maybe a station before another player. The player with the most points wins the game.


Let’s finish this roundup with a game that comes with English rules and has just gotten a BGG treatment: Salmon Run

In  Salmon Run, players want to move their salmon upstream as far as possible to lay eggs.

At the start of the round, players take turns laying down cards face down one at a time in a pyramid shape until each player has placed three cards. Then players take turns placing their salmon on a card in the first row.

Players then take turns in an action phase in which they optionally swim their salmon to a new location, jumping occupied spaces and revealing the card where they land, if it were hidden. Land on a bear and you’re out for the round unless you can counter with a bear from your hand. After moving, you can either place a card from your hand face down to add to the river or pass. Once all players pass in turn, the round ends and players then collect ikura tokens equal to their rank in the pyramid.


Stay tuned for one more games round-up before Game Market starts in one week. In the next round-up we will talk about the usual suspects like Oink Games, Okazu Brand and Manifest Destiny who all have new games to show at TGM.

If you have not already please fill out the survey to help us decide which games to bring back!

Global Boardgame News (April 24)

This series is released once or twice a month, covering international gaming news, trends and just plain gossip spotted online.

Got something we should write about? Leave it in the form below the article.

Tokyo Game Market is just around the corner. If you take a look at the official website where publishers announce their releases, you can see a massive amount of new games will be sold at the show.

The only other way to discover new titles is to follow the publishers’ Twitter accounts, where information is usually spread before anywhere else in the Japanese board game scene.

So the last few weeks we’ve been scouting both sources looking for new and interesting games to test and bring back to NiceGameShop in Germany.

We also made this survey for your input about which games should be a priority. Fill out the survey for your chance to win 50€ NiceGameShop store credit to use on all the hot new releases!

In the next few articles we’ll give you brief overviews of the new titles to make your decision a little easier – so let’s get started…

Tokyo Game Market has an abundance of games with cute artwork and unusual components, often handmade by the publisher and sold in very limited quantities.

The publisher Proto Craft showed Koroura last year, a abstract game in which you put dice in cute little tanks.

Now they’re following up with Access Magma, another abstract in which you fight with cute devils on lava tiles.

As the game was only announced on Twitter we don’t have any information on the rules yet.


In exciting news, Taiwanese publishers Shepherd Kit and The Wood Games are teaming up for TGM, and will be exhibiting together as Wood & Shepherd.

Shepherd Kit are releasing Adventurer’s Kit: Expedition, a treasure collecting card game and Paleolithic, being released at the same time with 2 separate expansions, Paleolithic: Dawn of Humanity and Paleolithic: Seafarers.

In Paleolithic:

Players act as elders from local tribes. The goal is to form a unique civilization through migration, resource gathering and tribal establishment. Bring along your tribal fellows and animal companions, and claim your land from the primal island of Formosa to become the great elder! [BGG]

Wood Games have two new editions of games already released in Europe: Emporion (previously released by Mont Taber) and Matryoshka (originally published by White Goblin Games in 2016). Both feature new artwork and come with Japanese and Chinese instructions, but are language independent and English rules are available online.

It’s interesting to see a Taiwanese publisher introducing locally unknown western games to their markets.


A similar case is Alpenzian, which will be released at TGM by Fukuroudou:

Alpenzian is a reimplementation of the game Sunflower Valley, with this re-design originating from the Japanese publisher’s discussions with designer Wouter van Strien. In addition to changes in the components, such as an original die with icons and different player sheets with new patterns to allow players to adjust the balance of the game, the gameplay has changed, with updated scoring rules and added variant rules for solitaire play. [BGG]


Game Market is always a fountain of quirky themes and unusual ideas. From the ubiquitous cat games to titles about managing hotel guests, nothing is too quirky.

I can not live by myself is a publisher who always has remarkable themes. After helping a Mayfly find a partner, blossoming a dandelion on a solitary island and hiding insects and moles in the soil, they are back with a game about Beluga whales.

Specifically one mother Beluga whale looking for her daughter:

You play as a mother beluga whale whose echo location system isn’t working properly, which is a problem as your daughter is lost and you want to reunite with her.

The game is divided into two halves: “Journey” and “Reunion”. In “Journey”, players collect ice cards that contain clues to the daughter’s location while trying not to be found by their natural enemy, the polar bear. [BGG]


Game Nowa is the publishing studio of designer Kenichi Kabuki, who has two new games in store for Tokyo Game Market.

Animals is a simple hand management game in which players try to get rid of their hand in order to score the cards remaining in the other players’ hands. Sengoku Domino mixes traditional dominoes with war games, so players struggle to take control in areas of the game board by strategically placing dominoes.


Blade Rondo is the new offering by Domina Games, and it features their distinctive art style. The game design and storytelling is by Pawn, known for such great solo play games like Shephy, Karen and the Pirate Island and Goritaire.

Blade Rondo is a card drafting game for 1-2 players in which the players draft just 7 cards each and battle each other. The solo version pits the players against folklorish creatures.


Ever thought about mixing the classic, beloved Settlers of Catan with poop? Well, Crap Games(!) did exactly that and will be selling Catain: The Most Longest Unco at TGM.

I’ll let the Google translation speak for itself:

Throw dice and collect hoods, make the longest feces and win people who could excrete safely!
Whether to stare on the path, disturb the opponent, reversal one shot or not, this feeling is boring!
Aim for an ass hole, Let’s More! [TGM Website]


Dyed-in-the-wool publisher Kenichi Tanabe will release two new designs with his studio Colon Arc.

Cinderella Magic,  co-designed with Peke of Takamagahara fame, is a fascinating deduction game I had the chance to play as a prototype last year.

Each player tries to help Cinderella attend the ball, but there needs to be all six different items present. These items are cards each player has in hand, and can be played either face down without effect or face up to trigger a special to help to deduce which items were already played.

On their turn, a player can instead announce they are going to ball and other players can decide whether to follow and then all cards are flipped.

If all six items were present, the players who went to the ball get a crystal slipper, while the players who passed get none; vice-versa if not all six items were present. The game ends when the glass slipper deck is emptied, and the players tally up their points.

The other game is another co-design but with Torjo Hojo, known for the Age of… series and Colony. From Batavia is a bigger design in which players:

Take simultaneous actions during each phase. Firstly, players choose a Cargo card face-down from their hand and reveal them together. Players pay the cost by discarding cards from their hand, but these discards go to their left neighbor.
The Cargo cards are placed onto their Ship cards to generate profits. When the values of the Cargos matches the Ship’ s total, the Ship is full and the player takes a new Ship card.
The first player to complete their third Ship is the biggest merchant and wins! [English Rules]


Analog Lunchbox made a name for themselves in 2017 with Lagerstätten, a worker placement game about excavating dinosaur fossils. They followed up with the beautiful Botanical Lab and will be showing two new games at TGM: Coffee House and the unusually colorful Passtally.

In Coffee House, 2-4 players are newspaper publishers meeting different people in late 17th century coffee house in London to gather news and gossip. Players try to manipulate the interests of the public, increase the value of the newspaper by acquiring expertise, and earn the most fame.

Passtally is a different beast altogether. In this abstract game, players move their pieces along an outside board, while laying connecting tiles across the interior in an attempt to create routes – all with a beautiful, minimalist aesthetic.


Dice Wide Shut by March Hare Games gained already a cult following prior to it’s release, mainly because of the quirky artwork on the cover. It’s:

A roll-and-write game that includes erasable markers and game boards. Try to fill the columns with checkmarks to score without bursting any rows! [BGG]


Let’s wrap this overview of new titles up with JUGAME Studio. We recently interviewed the team for NiceGameHub, when they unveiled two new releases.

Grand Opening!! Gourmet Town:

Is a game of producing successful eateries by seeking out the best locations and times for openings. ‘World Cuisine’, ‘Sweets’, ‘Drinks’, and ‘Japanese Food’ are the 4 Genres to produce… Trends fluctuate constantly, with every eatery that opens in town, so choosing the right moment is vital for success.

And Kamakura Collection:

Is a board game where players use 2 player pieces each to sightsee and experience as many attractions in the town of Kamakura by attaining Coins through visiting various sites and collecting travel memories. Certain sites and attractions may be overcrowded at times due to its popularity so seeking out the best time to visit becomes important in optimizing the experience.


We’ll soon be back again with even more new releases from the Tokyo Game Market. If you’re attending, we’d love to meet you there.

Oh, and don’t forget to fill out the survey for your chance to win 50€ NiceGameShop store credit!

Other links from around the world:

  • Our friends from Korea Boardgames are continuing their Kickstarter campaign for The Bark Side, a doggy trick-taker about avoiding the last trick. You can post your dog picture on Facebook or Twitter to win a copy of the game. And you can share the linked post on Facebook and Twitter to unlock the very cool dog meeple!
  • Law of the Forest by Strategic Game Society is now on Kickstarter – worth a look for anyone interested in Hong Kong and its wildlife! 

Introducing The Rondel

After 20 months with Sweet Lemon / Nice Game Publishing, our social media and website guy is moving on to some new projects – including an online marketplace for the tabletop industry. 

Nice Game Publishing is not affiliated with this site in any way. Still… best of luck, Ash! 


The Rondel is a new website for the tabletop industry. It allows illustrators, graphic designers, writers (and more) to create a free listing and get in touch with tabletop publishers.

As an online marketplace, creators set their own rates and accept or reject any offers from publishers. We handle the invoicing, payment and reviews (for both creators and publishers) to streamline the process for everyone.

We’ve only just moved into the soft launch, but you can already create a free account at this link.

You can also follow along via Twitter and Facebook.

FAQ

How much does it cost?

This question comes up a lot, so I try to stress it: The Rondel is free. Nobody will ever be charged for creating an account or making a listing (whether seeking or offering work).

So how does The Rondel make money?

Like most online marketplaces, The Rondel takes a 10% commission from successful sales – so if the publishers pays $100, the artist receives $90.

However, creators who sign up during the soft launch phase will receive three months of commission-free sales. This means The Rondel won’t take anything from your sales in this period.

But what if I make a big sale? 10% can add up…

At any point, creators can purchase a $20 monthly subscription that completely removes their commission fees. This effectively means The Rondel will never take more than $20 / month from creators – a pretty good deal, no?

Isn’t the site kind of small?

Correct! The Rondel has only just moved into soft launch. At the time of writing, there are 53 members.

You can check out the site at www.the-rondel.com.

Any questions, comments, suggestions? I’d love any and all feedback from artists, publishers, and anyone involved with board games. Just leave your thoughts below.

Thanks for taking a look!
Ash

Global Boardgame News (April 3)

This series is released once or twice a month, covering international gaming news, trends and just plain gossip spotted online.

Got something we should write about? Leave it in the form below the article.

There’s a lot to talk about in this edition: Osaka Game Market took place on April 1st (and didn’t fool around with new releases), we attended two fairs in Germany, and Kickstarter exploded with campaigns for global game lovers.

In terms of publisher attendance and new game releases, Game Market is the biggest tabletop fair in Asia, with three events in Japan each year. We regularly attend the two in Tokyo (so-called Spring and Autumn editions, in May and December) and will return in just a few weeks.

Then there’s the Kansai Game Market, which is smaller and held either in Kobe or in Osaka and before Tokyo Game Market Spring. This time it took place just a month before the Tokyo event, on April 1st.

In December, 2017, 730 publishers launched 466 new games at Tokyo Game Market, but there were still many new games ready for for release at Osaka Game Market.

Let’s take a look…

The hottest new release was Zogen by Oink Games, who these days are the most famous publishers in Japan, if not across Asia. Zogen is a reaction game for 2-6 players by Christoph Cantzler and Anja Wrede.

As the game description on Board Game Geek says:

In Zogen, a.k.a. ゾーゲン, the player researchers want to rid themselves of their microorganism cards as quickly as they can, but they can do so only by observing the current lab environment and watching the one thing that changes, then “recording” it by playing their card.

 

In more detail, each player starts with a hand of sixteen cards, with each card showing 0-4 types of microorganisms, which are named “Maru”, “Tsuki”, “Yama”, and “Siri”. The start player for the round places one of their cards face up on the table, then everyone plays at once, trying to lay down a card that differs from the initial card by exactly one microorganism, whether one more or one less.

 

Oink Games have been very successful and have quite a distinctive style. Maybe that is the reason so many companies try to copy them.

You probably heard of the accusation that WereWords copied Insider, and maybe you even saw the ridiculous copycat of Deep Sea Adventure at Kickstarter… and now there’s a new one released at Osaka Game Market.

A Genius Forger goes to New York has pens, paper and a similar art style in this drawing party game by Makoto Nakamura.

The rules, however, are quite different to the bestselling game from Oink. There isn’t much info on the web, but we could gather that you have to copy the drawing style of another player in order to win.

So it definitely isn’t a copycat. And, although we haven’t played the game, the price tag of only 500 yen (~4€) certainly wouldn’t stop us from buying it blind!

Hell Village is Group SNE‘s thematic follow-up to Demon Worker, although in this case the rules are not related.

Annecto Punch was previewed by Grandoor Games, the publisher behind Captain Dice and Wing Spirits. Their new title seems to be similar in terms of quirkiness, and definitely has the most fist bumps in any game I have seen yet.

It also seems highly language dependent.

Let’s wait and see if the final release comes with English in the box…

As it is the trend these days, itten also showed a giant version of Tokyo Highway. With streets big enough to knock someone unconscious I guess we won’t see a widespread release but it is cool to look at nevertheless.

In other Game Market news, Bruno Faidutti gave a panel talk with Hisashi Hayashi and Seiji Kanai. It was also revealed that One Draw’s classic Greedy Kingdoms will be released by AEG (this edition has Bruno Faidutti in the credits).

See this post for Bruno’s perspective on Osaka Game Market.

Speaking of Bruno Faidutti we also came across this very cool cover for the Iranian edition of Citadels which we had to share (by Hassan Nozadian):

MetroX, the new game Hisashi Hayashi and Okazu Brand sold out at Osaka Game Market. Good thing it’ll soon arrive at NiceGameShop (among other titles we mentioned here).

In this draw-and-write design:

Players create subway networks by filling in the station spaces on their individual game sheets. Using the numbers revealed by the cards, all players fill up their subway map with ◯s in the station spaces.

 

However, the number of times they can add stations to each line is limited, so they have to make tough choices. Players can score many points by getting their star bonuses in stations with many intersecting routes. Players also get bonuses by being the first to complete routes.

 

Try to fill in all your stations to minimize the penalties and achieve a high score!

Okazu Brand also just announced their new release for the imminent Tokyo Game Market(!).

In Stock hold’em (ストックホールデム), players are investors who want to use information to manipulate stock prices, buy and sell shares, and earn lots of money.
During the game, players place information cards with sources (i.e., suits) and numbers on each company, and all employees manipulate stock prices by making poker hands for each company.

 

Since some information about these cards — either the suit or the number — can be viewed from the backside of the card, players can speculate about how a company might be valued by guessing the hands of other players.

While the Nice Game team couldn’t attend Osaka Game Market, we did attend two local fairs in Germany: Spieletage in Ratingen and Spiel Doch! In Duisburg.

It was a pleasure bringing our games, Korea Boardgames and the NiceGameShop to both those fairs and meeting all you lovely people.

The next conventions we’ll be visiting are in May: Tokyo Game Market, Board Game Festa in Seoul and the inaugural Moonlight Boardgame Festival in Kaohsioung.

We’ll definitely have a lot to talk about after these fairs!

Other links from around the world:

Hilko’s Hoard: King Alfonso looks towards Argentina again

This is a guest post by Hilko Drude, translated from the German article originally published on his blog Du Bist Dran! 

I can’t help but take another look at the King Alfonso award in Argentina. In the end there’s barely an effort as systematic and honourable in any country, to elevate the local gaming scene out of obscurity, as there is in Argentina.

And there are interesting things here again this year.

Just like last year, there are nine games participating in the competition, which I would quickly like to present to you. Sadly I haven’t managed to establish contact with all of the authors and publishers this time around. So I couldn’t provide pictures for all of the games. Many of the publishing houses don’t have a website either, just a Facebook page, which I have then linked to.

Bienaventurados (The Blessed)

A card game with a Christian theme. Such games are generally shelf warmers, but the four Authors (Federico Acien, Germán Cuesta, Nicolás Passarino and Franco Toffoli) have apparently oriented themselves on games like 7 Wonders or Sushi Go in terms of game mechanics, and those can be rather successful, as experience has shown.

So the game is focused around passing around cards and drafting and creating a playing area that has as many points as possible, although the points of the different card types are again dependent on each other here. Meanwhile it’s intended that you learn something about a good Christian lifestyle.

It has been published by Tëkun, fits into a small card game box, and is illustrated by Carlos Julio Sánchez Suau.

Contame (Tell Me)

Also a very small game. It centers around telling stories by drawing cards from different decks and integrating the pictures or words into a story with a given genre. You can play it cooperatively or against one another (then you’ll get points, depending on how hard it was to incorporate the corresponding things into the story).

The target audiences are apparently first and foremost schools and libraries, where it seems to be well received. The publishing house Tinkuy, which consists of Gloria Claro, Ariel Marcel, Daniela Azulay and Rocio Gil, has already published a whole series of smaller card games dealing with poetry, literature and analog entertainment in general.

Contame, illustrated by Pablo Patini, will very likely not be the last in the series.

Corona de Hierro (The Iron Crown)

I’ve had this lying around, unplayed, since Essen. It’s not quite as easy to get it onto the table either, since it has cards with Spanish text. I’ll have to have the right visitors to be able to try it out.

Either way, the game is about becoming the most powerful noble in 9th century Italy, by arranging yourself with other nobles or the pope, besieging castles and winning battles. At the same time, every player also has a hidden goal, and not everyone wins by becoming the new King.

Corona de Hierro comes from Franco Toffoli (who also has his hand in play in Bienaventurados), has been illustrated by Luis Maria Dumon, Emiliano Mariano and Guillermo H. Nuñez and was published by El Dragón Azul.

El Delirio (The Delirium)

An abstract two player game in which you roam around with pyramid-shaped stones and capture the pyramids of your enemy. There are different goals in the game, but usually it apparently revolves around capturing one or more of the black pyramids of your enemy.

El Delirio is self-published by Daniel Martin.

Epidemia (Epidemic)

Also self-published is Jonathan Agustini’s Epidemia.

Here you need to be the last to survive. To do this, you need to protect your five organs, and attack the other player/s, manipulate immune systems or swap out an organ or two. Whoever has five damaged organs can’t win anymore, but can still annoy the others.

Futbolmesa (Football Table)

A football-simulation, as the name implies. Again I have only little information on the game, but you have players with differing stats and move the ball along the crossing points of the game board with their help.

It seems there is also a luck element involved, but I couldn’t find out how specifically. The Author, Pablo D’Andrea, published it in his publishing house Apóstrofe.

Geek Out! Masters

I already reported on Matias Saravias beautiful little dice game here.

In short, it’s centered around rolling the number 42 as often as possible. To do this, you need to rotate, re-roll or shoot the other dice, but definitely never leave them alone with dragons.

A small and handy game that can probably score points in a country where game costs are high also due to its price already. It is also published by El Dragón Azul, with illustrations by Gabriel Pintueles.

Magos & Tabernas

When there isn’t enough beer left in your favourite pub, it is definitely an advantage when you can do magic. Then you can conjure your own beer fight with the other guests for the last glass of beer, by throwing fireballs at their heads and other such things.

That’s what happens in Adrián Novell’s card game Magos & Tabernas published by Ludocracia, with illustrations by Matias Pan. Sadly this game is language dependent, so that it probably will not gain a lot of attention here (in Germany).

But a translation can always appear, if Magos & Tabernas can assert itself in Argentina.

Magus: Aura Mortis

A further development of Magus: Fortuna et Nostis, which Martin Oddino first published three years ago. Magus: Aura Mortis is one of the bigger games in the competition.

The players intrude into the castle of a mage and try to fulfill various missions there. They can use magic, attack, move or even change the whole structure of the castle (it consists of a game plan that can be set-up in various ways).

Even a cooperative mode is included, in which everyone fights against the evil archmage together. The game is illustrated by Lucas Charra and Maria Luz Cantisani Rovasio, and published by RunDOS.

Yes, that refers to what it sounds like, the publishing house also creates video games.


The winner of this years competition will be revealed on the 28th of April at the Geek Out Festival in Buenos Aires. I will surely report on it then.